Wednesday, July 18, 2018

What’s Your Passion - Our Daily Bread 28 July


 Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the Lord our God. Psalm 20:7
One of the tellers at my bank has a photograph of a Shelby Cobra roadster on his window. (The Cobra is a high-performance automobile built by the Ford Motor Company.)
One day, while transacting business at the bank, I asked him if that was his car. “No,” he replied, “that’s my passion, my reason to get up every morning and go to work. I’m going to own one someday.”
I understand this young man’s passion. A friend of mine owned a Cobra, and I drove it on one occasion! It’s a mean machine! But a Cobra, like everything else in this world, isn’t worth living for. Those who trust in things apart from God “are brought to their knees and fall,” according to the psalmist (Psalm 20:8).
That’s because we were made for God and nothing else will do—a truth we validate in our experience every day: We buy this or that because we think these things will make us happy, but like a child receiving a dozen Christmas presents or more, we ask ourselves, “Is this all?” Something is always missing. 
Nothing this world has to offer us—even very good things—fully satisfies us. There is a measure of enjoyment in them, but our happiness soon fades away (1 John 2:17). Indeed, “God cannot give us happiness and peace apart from Himself,” C. S. Lewis concluded. “There is no such thing.”
I have found Him whom my soul so long has craved! Jesus satisfies my longings—through His blood I now am saved. Clara Williams
There is a longing in every heart that only Jesus can satisfy.
By David H. Roper | See Other Authors

INSIGHT

Psalm 20 warns against idolatry—worshiping and trusting in human objects instead of the Lord Himself. King David saw how easy it could be to shift his trust in the Lord to trust in military might: “Some trust in chariots and some in horses,   but we trust in the name of the Lord our God” (v. 7). In our culture, idolatry can take many different forms. But for the believer there’s only One who should be the object of our adoration and the One in whom we place our trust. It’s Christ who is the supreme example of courage, character, and compassion.
How is God teaching you that He’s the only true source of satisfaction?

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

JULY 17, 2018 Equal - Joyce Meyer Daily Devotion


Here there is not Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free; but Christ is all, and in all.
— Colossians 3:11
Equal means “just; equitable; giving the same or similar rights or advantages.” 
The world places labels and assigns varying values to almost everything, but in God’s eyes, we are all equal. He loves and values each of us equally. We are all one in Christ! 
Don’t spend your time thinking over and over about your faults. And don’t compare yourself with other people, thinking that you should strive to be like them. Oscar Wilde said, “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.” 
I strongly suggest that you make peace with yourself, if you haven’t already done so, and learn to think about yourself the way God does. Remember, God loves you just as much as He does everyone else. We are all equal in His sight. 
Prayer Starter: Father, thank You for loving me...and for making me a unique and special individual. Help me to receive Your love more and more each day. Help me to truly love myself and break free from comparing myself to others. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

Life Is About Relationship, Not Acquisition BY RICK WARREN — JULY 17, 2018

“But as for me, my contentment is not in wealth but in seeing you and knowing all is well between us. And when I awake in heaven, I will be fully satisfied, for I will see you face-to-face” (Psalm 17:15 TLB).
Life is not about things. You’ve got to maintain the right perspective about possessions, or you’ll be possessed by your possessions. You’ve got to realize none of it is going to last.
Jesus says in Luke 12:15, “Watch out and guard yourselves from every kind of greed; because your true life is not made up of the things you own, no matter how rich you may be” (GNT).
Never judge your self-worth by your net worth. Never think your value is related to your valuables. Realize that the greatest things in life aren’t things. You didn’t bring anything into the world, and you’re not taking anything out of it. Life is not about acquisition or achievement. Life is about relationship and learning how to love God and other people.
The best way to remember that your life is not about things is to build your life on eternal priorities. Focus on what will last forever. Every possession is temporary, so don’t build your life on acquiring possessions. Only two things are going to last forever: the Word of God and people.
You’ve got a choice to make. The world is telling you that you’ve got to get more to be happier, more successful, more important, more valuable, and more secure. You’ve got to decide if you’re going to listen to Madison Avenue or the Master. Are you going to listen to culture or Christ? Are you going to listen to the world or the Word?
One will make you dissatisfied the rest of your life; one will make you truly happy. Before you can move toward financial freedom, you have to ask yourself, “What is the primary purpose of my life? To just get more? What do I think about, talk about, and give my most to? What am I living my life for?”
There was a famous millionaire in Orange County who took her own life many years ago. At the funeral somebody said, “I don’t understand it. She had so much to live for.” I thought, “No. She had so much to live on. She had nothing to live for.”
You may have a lot to live on, but do you have anything to live for? Do you have a relationship with God? The myth of the world is that you can have it all. The truth is that you can’t have it all. And more importantly, you don’t need it all to be happy. You’re as happy as you choose to be.
The secret of contentment is finding your security and your satisfaction not in what you have but in whose you are. You find it in Christ.
Psalm 17:15 says, “But as for me, my contentment is not in wealth but in seeing you and knowing all is well between us. And when I awake in heaven, I will be fully satisfied, for I will see you face-to-face”(TLB).
Talk It Over

  • What tangible or intangible things have you been acquiring instead of strengthening your walk with God?
  • How have you sacrificed your relationships in the pursuit of success or status? What do you need to do today to start repairing those relationships?
  • Are you okay with not “having it all”? Why or why not?

July 17 Make Hell Tremble Gloria Copeland


For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil.
1 John 3:8
Is the devil giving you fits today? Is he causing trouble for you at every turn?
If so, turn the table on him. Start making him miserable for a change. You have the power to do it, you know. You have the power residing in you to destroy his works, to heal, to deliver, to set the captives free. You have so much power in you that every time your alarm clock goes off, the devil should wail, "Oh no! That troublemaker is up again!"
A few years ago, I got a letter from a little girl who had attended one of my healing services in Los Angeles. Although she was far too young to understand theology or anything like that, the Lord gave her a very simple and profound revelation as she watched people being healed.
She said that as she looked up at the platform, she couldn't see me at all. She just saw Jesus. And she also saw a devil. Do you know what the devil was doing? He was lying on the floor crying, "This can't be! This can't be! This can't be!"
Right now, at this very moment, the power of the Lord Jesus Christ is at work within you. And it's not just there to get you to heaven someday. It's there so you can give the devil a fit right here on earth. It's there so you can build the kingdom of God now—while there's still time.
Line up with God's Word and will for your life. Let the Anointing of Jesus go forth from within you. All of hell will tremble. And you will never be quite the same again.
Scripture Reading:
1 John 5:4-20
© 1991 Eagle Mountain International Church, Inc. aka: Kenneth Copeland Publications    All rights reserved.

I Just Can’t Do It July 17, 2018 Our Daily Bread Ministries daily devotion


The law was our tutor to bring us to Christ, that we might be justified by faith. Galatians 3:24 nkjv
“I just can’t do it!” lamented the dejected student. On the page he could see only small print, difficult ideas, and an unforgiving deadline. He needed the help of his teacher.
We might experience similar despair when we read Jesus’s Sermon on the Mount. “Love your enemies” (Matthew 5:44). Anger is as bad as murder (v. 22). Lust equals adultery (v. 28). And if we dare think we can live up to these standards, we bump into this: “Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect” (v. 48).
“The Sermon on the Mount produces despair,” says Oswald Chambers. But he saw this as good, because at “the point of despair we are willing to come to [Jesus] as paupers to receive from Him.”
In the counterintuitive way God so often works, those who know they can’t do it on their own are the ones who receive God’s grace. As the apostle Paul put it, “Not many of you were wise by human standards. . . . But God chose the foolish things of the world to shame the wise” (1 Corinthians 1:26–27).
In God’s wisdom, the Teacher is also our Savior. When we come to Him in faith, through His Spirit we enjoy His “righteousness, holiness and redemption” (v. 30), and the grace and power to live for Him. That’s why He could say, “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 5:3).
Thank You, Lord, for blessing those who are poor in spirit, who mourn, and who hunger and thirst for Your righteousness. You are our righteousness!
Read more from Oswald Chambers at utmost.org.
Through the Son we can enjoy life in God’s kingdom. 
By Tim Gustafson | See Other Authors

INSIGHT

The Bible is filled with stories of how God used weak, unlikely, or flawed characters to bring about His purposes. Included in that lineup are Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Rahab, Gideon, and Peter—just to name a few. God chose elderly Abraham and his barren wife to be “the father [and mother] of many nations” (Genesis 17:5). He used Isaac, who played favorites (25:27–28), and Jacob, a deceiver, to continue that line (25:29–34; 27:1–29). God called the reluctant Moses, a murderer on the run, to lead His people out of slavery in Egypt (Exodus 2:11–15; 14:1–31). God chose the prostitute Rahab to hide the spies in Jericho (Joshua 2) and to be included in the genealogy of Jesus (Matthew 1:5); He called Gideon, who cowered in fear, to serve as judge and rescue the Israelites from the Midianites (Judges 6–8); and He appointed Peter, an outspoken fisherman, to be His disciple (Matthew 16:22). God still uses flawed characters—you and me—to fulfill His purposes.
For more on how God can use you, check out christianuniversity.org/SF212

Joy Comes in the Morning - Joel Osteen Ministries daily devotion 16 July


Today’s Scripture
"...Weeping may last through the night, but joy comes with the morning."
(Psalm 30:5, NLT)

Watch Moments of Encouragement
Joy Comes in the Morning
When you wake up each morning, God sends you a special delivery of joy. It comes knocking at your door. When you get up in faith and make the declaration that "this is going to be a good day," do you know what you just did? You just answered the door. You just received the gift of joy that God sent to you. The problem is that some people never answer the door. Joy has been knocking for months and months, years and years saying, "Come on! Let me in! You can be happy! You can enjoy your life!"
Make up your mind that you're going to answer the door for joy. Wake up every morning and say, "Father, thank You for another beautiful day. I'm going to be happy. I'm going to enjoy this day. I'm going to brighten somebody else's life. I receive Your gift of joy, today!"
A Prayer for Today
"Father, thank You for joy. Thank You for peace. Thank You for walking me through the difficult times. I choose today to answer the door for joy every single morning so that I can walk in the strength You have given to me in Jesus’ name. Amen."

No Co-Signer Required - Our Daily Bread Ministries daily devotion 16 July

People swear by someone greater than themselves, and the oath confirms what is said. Hebrews 6:16

When a person without a long history of paying his or her bills on time wants to obtain a loan to purchase a home or car, lenders are often reluctant to take the financial risk. Without a track record, that person’s promise to repay what he borrows is insufficient for the bank. The would-be borrower usually resorts to finding someone who does have a history of making good on their debts, asking them to put their name on the loan too. The co-signer’s promise assures the lender the loan will be repaid.
When someone makes a promise to us—whether for financial, marital, or other reasons—we expect them to keep it. We want to know that God will keep His promises too. When He promised Abraham that He would bless him and give him “many descendants” (Hebrews 6:14; see Genesis 22:17), Abraham took God at His word. As the Creator of all that exists, there is no one greater than He; only God could guarantee His own promise.
Abraham had to wait for the birth of his son (Hebrews 6:15) (and never saw how innumerable his offspring would grow to be), but God proved faithful to His promise. When He promises to be with us always (13:5), to hold us securely (John 10:29), and to comfort us (2 Corinthians 1:3–4), we too can trust Him to be true to His word.
Lord, thank You for being so trustworthy. I need no other promises but Your word. Help me to trust You more and more each day.
God’s promises are sure.
By Kirsten Holmberg | See Other Authors

INSIGHT

In Hebrews 6:19, the metaphor of an anchor is used to describe the believer’s secure hope. This metaphor was a common one in Greco-Roman literature and was used to describe a person’s security and hope based on their good character.
But the author of Hebrews does not describe the believer’s “anchor”—their hope (6:11–12)—as based on their own character. Instead, the author says our hope is found “behind the curtain” (v. 19)—alluding to the “holy of holies” in the temple. In the past, this was the primary place where God’s people could fully experience God’s presence. Only the high priest could enter, and only once a year.
But now Jesus, the One both fully God and fully human, is our priest, the One who gives access to God. Because He has conquered sin and death, our rock-solid hope is anchored in Him. Through Christ we experience the very presence and power of God (v. 20).

What’s Your Passion - Our Daily Bread 28 July

 Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the  Lord  our God.  Psalm 20:7 One of the tellers at my ba...