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Friday, August 18, 2017

You’re an Original - Our Daily Bread Ministries daily devotion 18 August Friday

Know that the Lord is God. It is he who made us, and we are his. Psalm 100:3
Each of us is an original from God’s hand. There are no self-made men or women. No one ever became talented, buffed, or bright all by himself or herself. God made each of us all by Himself. He thought of us and formed us out of His unspeakable love.
God made your body, mind, and soul. And He isn’t done with you; He is still making you. His single-minded purpose is our maturity: “He who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus” (Phil. 1:6). God is making you braver, stronger, purer, more peaceful, more loving, less selfish—the kind of person you’ve perhaps always wanted to be.
“[God’s] unfailing love continues forever and his faithfulness continues to each generation” (Ps. 100:5 nlt). God has always loved you (“forever” goes both ways), and He will be faithful to you to the end.
You’ve been given a love that lasts forever and a God who will never give up on you. That’s a good reason to have joy and to “come before him with joyful songs”! (v. 2).
If you can't carry a tune, just give Him a shout-out: “Shout for joy to the Lord” (v. 1).
I’m grateful, Father, that You are at work in me. I find it difficult to change and I wonder sometimes how or if I ever will. Yet I know that You are continuing Your work in me and as I look back I will see the growth You are producing. Thank You!
Spiritual growth occurs when faith is cultivated.
By David H. Roper | See Other Authors
INSIGHT:
The book of Psalms is commonly known as the hymnbook of ancient Israel. But the opening line of Psalm 100 takes this beautiful hymn out of the sanctuary of Israel and places it in the mouths of everyone: “Shout for joy to the Lord, all the earth.” Since this is written to “all the earth,” what follows applies to all of us.
Because God is the Creator of all, He is also the Father of all. We all belong to Him; we are the “sheep of his pasture” (v. 3). We are all called to give Him thanks and praise, even though believers may be the only ones who answer this call. We are commissioned to help those who do not recognize God and His faithfulness to “enter his gates” (v. 4).
Who can you invite into His “gates”? How can you show and tell them about God’s goodness and enduring love? How can you thank Him for His faithfulness to you?
For more on the book of Psalms read, Together With God at dhp.org/TogetherWithGod. J.R. Hudberg

Get Out From Under Gloria Copeland Ministries daily devotion 18 August Friday

Ye are of God, little children, and have overcome them: because greater is he that is in you, than he that is in the world.
1 John 4:4
Under the circumstances….  Have you ever caught yourself using that phrase?
“I suppose I’m doing pretty well under the circumstances.”
If you’ve ever said something like that, I want you to kick those words out of your vocabulary right now. Because you, as a victorious child of God, don’t have any business living your life “under” your circumstances. You don’t have any business letting problems and situations rule over you.
Two thousand years ago, Jesus—the One who is in you—ransacked Satan’s kingdom. Through His death at Calvary, He legally entered the regions of the damned and stripped Satan of everything. He took away all his armor. He took the keys to death and hell. He bound that strong man, looted his kingdom, and Colossians says He spoiled principalities and powers and made a show of them openly, triumphing over them.
Then Jesus turned around and gave that victory to you. You are of God. Remember that! You have overcome through Jesus because He lives in you. You never have to live “under” the circumstances again!
Scripture Reading:
Colossians 1:9-15
© 1991 Eagle Mountain International Church, Inc. aka: Kenneth Copeland Publications    All rights reserved.

Promise of a Peaceful Home - Our Daily Bread Ministries daily devotion 17 August Thursday

Everyone will sit under their own vine and under their own fig tree, and no one will make them afraid. Micah 4:4
Sixty-five million. That’s the number of refugees in our world today—people who have had to leave their homes due to conflict and persecution—and it’s higher than it’s ever been. The UN has petitioned leaders to work together in receiving refugees so that every child will get an education, every adult will find meaningful work, and every family will have a home.
The dream of making homes for refugees in crisis reminds me of a promise God made to the nation of Judah when ruthless Assyrian armies threatened their homes. The Lord commissioned the prophet Micah to warn the people that they would lose their temple and their beloved city of Jerusalem. But God also promised a beautiful future beyond the loss.
A day will come, said Micah, when God will call the peoples of the world to Himself. Violence will end. Weapons of war will become farming tools, and every person who answers God’s call will find a peaceful home and a productive life in His kingdom (4:3–4).
For many in the world today, and maybe for you, a safe home remains more a dream than a reality. But we can rely on God’s ancient promise of a home for people of all nations, even as we wait and work and pray for those peaceful homes to become a reality.
God, thank You for the beautiful promise of a home. Please bring peace to our world, and provide for the needs of all of Your children.
God promises His children a peaceful home in His kingdom.
By Amy Peterson | See Other Authors
INSIGHT:
Micah (whose name means “Who is like Jehovah?”) was a prophet for the Southern Kingdom of Judah. His ministry overlapped with that of the prophet Isaiah. Micah calls His people to reflect God’s heart when he says: “Act justly . . . love mercy and . . . walk humbly” with Him (6:8). Micah tells us that God’s heart delights “to show mercy” (7:18). And Micah prophesied, “But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, . . . out of you will come for me one who will be ruler over Israel, whose origins are from of old, from ancient times” (5:2).
This promise was realized in the person of Jesus. The timeless God has sent His Son to our rescue—and Micah helped prepare people for His arrival. Bill Crowder

If You Sow Generosity, You Will Reap Generosity BY RICK WARREN — AUGUST 17 Thursday

“Remember this: Whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows generously will also reap generously. Each of you should give what you have decided in your heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver” (2 Corinthians 9:6-7 NIV).
The Bible says in 2 Corinthians 9:6-7, “Remember this: Whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows generously will also reap generously. Each of you should give what you have decided in your heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver” (NIV).
The principle of sowing and reaping applies to every area of life, not just your finances. Whatever you sow in life, you’re going to reap. Whatever you deposit is going to be returned to you. If you sow criticism in life, you are going to reap criticism from other people. If you sow kindness, you’re going to reap kindness. It’s the law of the harvest. If you plant apple seeds, you don’t get pears; you get apples. If you sow with generosity, you will reap generosity.
This is the principle of the harvest: Whenever you have a need, plant a seed. When a farmer looks at his barren fields, he doesn’t gripe about it. He just goes out and starts planting some seed. If he only has a little bit of seed, he has a choice. He can either hoard it, or he can give it away. If he holds on to it, that’s all he's got. If he gives it away, God will multiply it. The amazing thing is this: You don’t just reap what you sow. You always reap more than you sow!
God set it up this way because he wants you to become like him. God is a giver. The only way that you’re ever going to become like him is to learn to be generous. When you’re stingy, you’re like the Devil. When you’re generous, you’re like God. When you give it away, God multiplies it.
This sounds illogical — to give away when you have a need so that you will get more back. But that’s why it requires faith! God says the way you get is by giving, not by holding on.
Talk It Over
  • When have you received from God and others more than you gave away?
  • How should you decide what to give?
  • What is a need in your life right now? How can you give that very thing away to others?

Waiting - Joel Osteen Ministries daily devotion 17 August Thursday

Today’s Scripture
"…faith without works is dead."
(James 2:20, NKJV)

Waiting
Are you waiting for God to do something in your life? One thing I’ve learned is that waiting should not be a passive thing. When we’re waiting the correct way, we’re on the lookout. We talk like what we are believing for is going to happen. We act like it’s going to happen. We’re making preparations.
It’s just like when you’re expecting someone for dinner; you don’t wait till they show up before you decide to start cooking. Most likely you start early in the day. You make sure the house is clean, you go to the grocery store, and maybe you buy some flowers for the table. You make preparations because you’re expecting someone. Well, that’s the attitude we need to have while we’re waiting for God’s promises to come to pass. Put your faith to work. Prepare for the answer to come. Keep standing, keep believing, and keep hoping because your answer is on the way!
A Prayer for Today
"Father God, I choose to put actions behind my faith today. I trust that You are at work in my life. I will wait the right way—with expectancy—knowing that my faith in You opens the door for Your hand to move in my life in Jesus’ name. Amen."

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Be Ready to Be Interrupted by Joyce Meyer - posted August 17 Thursday

I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd risks and lays down His [own] life for the sheep.
- John 10:11
The more I study the men and women in the Bible whom we consider to be "great," the more I see that they all made huge sacrifices and there was nothing convenient about what God asked them to do.
Abraham had to leave his country, his relatives, and his home and go to a place God would not even tell him about until he went there. Joseph saved a nation from starvation, but not before he was violently removed from his comfortable home and put in an inconvenient place for many years. Esther saved the Jews from destruction, but God certainly interrupted her plan in order for her to do so.
The list of individuals who entered into sacrificial obedience could go on and on. The Bible calls them people "of whom the world was not worthy" (see Hebrews 11:38). These people we read about were inconvenienced so that someone else's life could be easier. Jesus died so we could have life and have it abundantly. Soldiers die so that civilians can remain safe at home. Fathers go to work so their families can have nice lives, and mothers go through the pain of childbirth to bring another life into the world. It seems quite obvious that someone usually has to experience pain or inconvenience for anyone to gain anything.
If you make the decision that you don't mind inconvenience or interruption, then God can use you. You can make a difference in the world. But if you remain addicted to your own comfort, God will have to pass you by for someone who is more willing to endure the hard things in life in order to do God's will.
Trust in Him: Think about a situation in which God is asking you to do some things you would rather not do—stay in a situation, leave a situation, spend time with someone you don't get along with . . . Are you willing to trust the "interruption" from God in order to do His will?


From the book Trusting God Day by Day by Joyce Meyer. Copyright © 2012 by Joyce Meyer. Published by FaithWords. All rights reserved.

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